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Galphimia glauca or Gold Shower

Common name: Gold Shower, Golden Thryallis
Botanic name: Galphimia glauca syn. Thryallis glauca
Family: Malpighiaceae

A robust shrub for tropical and sub-tropical climates that will tolerate an exposed position.

Sun Exposure: Part sun to part shade
Origin: Mexico, Guatemala
Zone: USDA 9b-11
Growth Habits: Evergreen tropical shrub, fast growing to 3 to 6 feet tall (0.9-1.8 m) or more, 3 to 4 feet wide (0.9-1.2 m); stems covered with red hair; elliptic, glossy, gray-green leaves, up to 2 inches long (5 cm)

Blooming Habits: Small yellow star-shaped flowers, 0.6 to 0.8 inch in diameter (1-5-2 cm), in clusters at the stem tips, in late summer and fall. In warm climates, it blooms most of the year.
Fruiting Habits: Three part seed capsules
Watering Needs: Moderate water, slightly drought resistant, needs good drainage, prefers soils rich in organic content
Propagation: Seeds, cuttings in summer

This planting is in the Driveway Rock garden.

Purchased.

Latest Milestone Established

Quantity: 1

Plant Galphimia glauca Galphimia glauca 5

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Comments

Did you know this plant is also a traditional medicinal which is showing great promise in current medical research? I stumbled upon the medical info by Googling the plant just to learn more about it.
Research study results about the anxiolytic efficacy of extracts from this plant have been very encouraging so far- results were comparable to the antianxiety drug lorazepam, but with less patient complaints (it is better tolerated).
See Footnote
1 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17562493

Traditionally used among some Mexicans as a herbal nerve tonic, which is how it ended up being studied further.

Posted on 08 Aug 11 (about 4 years ago)

Amazing! No I didn’t know that this beauty has been used as a nerve tonic. Isn’t it fascinating how plants can be so beneficial in treating various medical problems, but so much of this knowledge has been lost over the generations. Sounds like this plant might be very very beneficial.

Posted on 08 Aug 11 (about 4 years ago)

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