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Chinese Wisteria      

I ordered 6 of these from a garden catalog several years ago, probably in 2000-2001. When they arrived I found bareroot sticks in the package – they were very cheap so I shouldn’t have expected anything more. I planted them all around the cellar with the dream that one day it would be dripping in fragrant blue-lavender blooms. All but one died or mysteriously disappeared (I suspect a playful puppy may have pulled them up). This is the only one left, and I had given up on it ever blooming. That is until today. I hadn’t paid any attention to it this spring, but today I moved one of the runners out of the way of the lawnmower and was shocked to find ‘things’ hanging from the branches! I can hardly wait to see it bloom!

This planting has been archived (Other).

Purchased from Burgess Catalog

Quantity: 1

Plant Chinese Wisteria Wisteria sinensis 47

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Name Garden Gardener Location Planted Archived

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Comments

Wisteria is one of my favorite plants. The perfume from the flowers sweetens the air in the entire yard! In my area, it spreads rampantly, so most people wrap the vines around themselves and create a Wisteria “bush” so that it won’t take over all the trees and yard. In roadsides and vacant property, an escape can drape every tree for a good distance. This is not good for the trees, but what a show every spring! Wow!

Posted on 23 Apr 08 (over 11 years ago)

I didn’t realize Wisteria was invasive until after I purchased it. I had planned to prune it after it blooms to prevent it from taking over, but your comment about wrapping it around itself sounds like a better idea. I’ll give that a try first – the idea of tons of blooms all over it is so appealing! Thank you!

Posted on 23 Apr 08 (over 11 years ago)

Yes, those “bushes” are really a great solution. You can even mow under them, as long as you just keep wrapping the vines around themselves. Also, pruning can cause the wisteria to have less blooms, and the “bushes” bloom so prolifically that they are awesomely stunning! A neighbor of mine has a 10+ year old wisteria bush, and last year she pruned it back heavily, simply to make the bush diameter smaller. This year she had very little flowering, but now the vines are starting to grow again, and she is wrapping it to reform the rounded shape. Hopefully, it will bloom much better next year.

Posted on 25 Apr 08 (over 11 years ago)

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