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How do I save strawberry starts until transplanting

I purchased a gorgeous bag of strawberry starts from Walmart. I believe they are Quinault. I have read a lot about making sure I cut off all new growth to let the root system take place and all that, but the problem I have is that I want to plant them and let them take root outside when it warms up, and just keep them alive up until that point (march or april timeframe i believe is when I’ll transplant them into my square foot garden 4×4 container.)

Right now they are mostly in water… can I keep them in water or should I pot them?

Second question… When I get new growth that I plan to cut off can I replant those “shoots(?)” ?

Thanks for looking and any help is much appreciated!

Posted over 8 years ago
TropicanaRoses

TropicanaRoses

Folia Helper

United States7

dpenwell, I do not know how well they will do staying in the bag…I waited a couple of weeks after buying mine last year..didn’t know about cutting off the growth, but I planted them in Peat pots…they all eventually died. Some sprouted leaves, started growing them, and then just died. I don’t like the bag…I don’t think it’s good for them.

My suggestion would be to put them in peat pots with potting soil suitable for strawberry plants, and then stick them in a dark cool place until spring…then put them out in a sheltered area for an hour or two a day, gradually lengthening the time out to harden them off. That is what my limited experience taught me.

Posted over 8 years ago

Thanks for responding TropicanaRoses. I did take them all out of the bag already. I have pictures on my square foot garden page.
http://myfolia.com/plantings/188687-strawberries-fragaria-x-ananassa

I put most of the ones with roots in water and some broke off and I tried to put those directly in soil because I heard they would take root. What I have been reading about cutting the (shoots I believe they are called) is that that will allow the plant to expend its energy on developing a good root system rather than producing fruit and a large plant for about the first year. Don’t know if that would work for me. If I did that I was thinking maybe I should save some of the “shoots”? and plant them in soil because I would like a few more plants than I have, and just in case something goes wrong with the first ones I would have extra to spare. My hope is to fill a 4×4 square in my square foot garden, though I don’t know if we could eat that many. I have read that would be about 60 plants needed.

One person even said you should cut off new buds for the whole first year for a better plant the next year. I was hoping I could have a late harvest at least though. I don’t think I could be that patient.

I am considering making a basket out of them and keeping them indoors for now and if I can take cuttings I will replant those in a square of my square foot garden.

I hope they turn out one way or another! This is my first real garden because we purchased our home and had a baby in June of last year, so by the time I got my act together I pretty much missed the season!

Posted over 8 years ago
TropicanaRoses

TropicanaRoses

Folia Helper

United States7

My growing season was interrupted in the middle by the purchase of a home also. :)

What I have learned from some seasoned gardeners here is that the plants which you have, will put out runners. Each runner, when it comes into contact with the soil, will create a new plant. When the plant is established, you cut the runner so that the baby does not drain the mother plant…sort of like a spider plant. Your babies will have babies, and so on. I have a decent sized patch, which I inherited from the former owner last year…but I don’t know which are the oldest plants. I was told that there is something that you can do to extend the 3-5 year plant. I was thinking that since I don’t know, I will let them fruit out this year, and the ones that do not fruit, I will cut back to just above the crown, and they should fruit next year. :)

Anyway, the first part of this post was for you, the second part was just my rant. :)

Posted over 8 years ago

Thank Tropicana. This is what I was wondering. Glad to hear that I can replant the runners. I have went ahead and planted what I have in pots and I may try to transplant them into a square foot garden box when it warms up.

I hope yours turn out this year!

Posted over 8 years ago
TropicanaRoses

TropicanaRoses

Folia Helper

United States7

Thanks! I just found out yesterday that the bed is 14 years old…so there will definitely be some plants that need to go. :) I think I will have fun with this project this year.

Posted over 8 years ago

Wow, I thought I posted a response here, but I guess not – Brain Freeze. Those are really small bareroots. I’d pot up the bareroots until April. As soon as the ground is soft enough to plant, I’d plant them, then cover them with straw until after last frost in early May for zone 5a. I’ve stored bareroots for a month wrapped in paper towels and dipping them in water every couple of days, but they’d never make it until May.

Tropicana was right that you can propagate from runners. I started my current bed with 75 plants in 2009 and now have over 3500 plants using this technique. Raised beds are really the best way to go in order to control slugs which can devastate a crop overnight. There are some important thing to watch if you’re setting up a bed, like spacing, Ph, and feeding. I covered a lot of this in another thread.

Posted over 8 years ago

Hi there! You're reading a conversation in the Strawberry Talk group on Folia.