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Anyone Making Mustard?

laurieann

laurieann

Folia Helper

United States7b

I just purchased some Mizuna seeds and wondering if it would also be good for saving seed to make my own mustard. If not, are there particular varieties better suited for making mustard?

Posted over 8 years ago

I tried making mustard a couple years ago. I found the big hurdle for me was harvesting the seeds.

Basically, I learn that if I had to rely on my threshing abilities to survive, I’d starve!

Posted over 8 years ago

LOL! For tasks such as making my own mustard I go to the bulk food store to buy yellow and brown mustard seed and save my time for other tasks. It’s just not labor friendly. Meaning if you spend 5 hours gleaning/thrashing saving to make one jar of mustard, although good, comes down to about $75/jar. My time is money and I factor my time to be about $15/hour. It helps me prioritize. But if this is something you love and want to do don’t let anyone talk you out of it. It all feels like an accomplishment or learning experience and those are priceless.

Posted over 8 years ago

Brassica rapa var. nipposinica – this isn’t on the familiar with me. The typical are below.

Mustard seeds are the small round seeds of various mustard plants. The seeds are typically about 1 or 2 mm in diameter. Mustard seeds may be colored from yellowish white to black. They are important spices in many regional cuisines. The seeds can come from three different plants: black mustard (Brassica nigra), brown Indian mustard (B. juncea), and white mustard (B. hirta/Sinapis alba). source: Wikipedia

Posted over 8 years ago
creme

creme

Folia Helper

United States5

I made mustard last year from store bought seed.

This year I am hoping to grow mustard for both Greens to eat and seeds to use for spice. I’m ambitious that way.

Posted over 8 years ago

I use mustard seed for my sweet pickle recipe, but never even considered growing my own seed. I hate it when I buy spices – so expensive. But then there’s a reason for that, some things I don’t want to grow myself – way too much work.

Posted over 8 years ago
TropicanaRoses

TropicanaRoses

Folia Helper

United States7

I have considered making mustard from my seeds…not sure if I am growing mustard this year, but I am still considering growing it, and using the seed for mustard. I also do not know if there are any that you Can’t use.

Posted over 8 years ago
laurieann

laurieann

Folia Helper

United States7b

Hmmm… Didn’t think about the amount of labor involved. But if I’m saving seed anyway. We’ll see how much I get. If it’s just a little, I’ll just use them for growing next season’s mustard greens. I wonder if one small seed packet will grow enough mustard greens to save enough seed to make even one jar… Oh, well – Looks like Creme, TR and I will have to report back on this later!

Posted over 8 years ago

For reference, with 4 plants I got about 1/2 a cup of seeds. I figure I only got about 1/3 of the seeds produced.

Keep in mind, once they bolt mustards get to be HUGE. I understood why the Bible talks about this little seed becoming a tree.

Posted over 8 years ago
laurieann

laurieann

Folia Helper

United States7b

Thanks for the info Erik. It helps to get a little perspective!
For those that are interested – I just found this article talking about growing mustard greens and making mustard.

Posted over 8 years ago

Brassica seeds in general (which includes mustard, turnips, radish, chard) are a hideous pain in the ass to save. I apparently didn’t journal the agony of harvesting turnip seeds— I did it, but oy. Never again. Here’s what I had to say about mustard: http://myfolia.com/journals/67167-now-i-know-why-mustard-is-so-expensive

Posted over 8 years ago
cristyn

cristyn

Folia Helper

United States5b

I saved a ton of mustard seed and really enjoyed the process. But that was when I was supposed to be writing my dissertation. I can’t imagine finding it at all relaxing now, because I don’t have a dissertation I’m supposed to be writing. It’s only fun if it’s a meditative procrastination thing. So I’ve got to advise any doctoral candidates out there to save mustard seeds while you get the chance ‘cause you’ll never want to do it again. :)

That said, I used the seeds for microgreens, not mustard. All things being equal, I’d use my saved seeds for microgreens and if I run out of mustard I’ll make it from purchased spice seeds. Partly ‘cause I know my seeds will sprout and be yummy and the seeds from the store haven’t been saved and stored with their continued fertility in mind.

Posted over 8 years ago
laurieann

laurieann

Folia Helper

United States7b

Thanks for the link to your journal Xan – very helpful info!
Good point Cristyn – maybe that’s what I’ll do if I don’t end up harvesting an “abundance” of seed. I mean purchase seed for making mustard – not writing a dissertation!!!

Posted over 8 years ago

I could not run out of mustard even if I wanted to. A few varieties of mustard were started 3 years ago and now we do not have to sow any. I use the greens for salads and other dishes and I let them go to seed cause I like the bright yellow flowers and the insects like them too.

Posted about 4 years ago

I know how to prepare mustard salad.it is called buro or fermented mustard leaves.the easy to prepare type is just by adding organic apple vinegar to mustard leaves (sliced) with onion and garlic and salt.perfect with steamed fish.

Posted about 4 years ago

Hi there! You're reading a conversation in the Preserving the Harvest group on Folia.