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Homemade Hot Sauce

I am about to try and make my first hot sauce.

I have been looking into this a bit and it seems you can make it by chucking everything in a jar and letting it ferment for weeks or cook up your ingredients and have “instant” hot sauce.

I have also come across advice that says to leave the base of the stem attached for added flavour. Anyone do this?

Any thoughts? Or favourite hot sauce recipes!

Posted almost 7 years ago | Last edited almost 7 years ago

My aunt cut off a big bag of my wee little hot peppers last year and put them in a jar with vinegar and stuck them in the refrigerator. It had a shaker top and you just shake out the hot vinegar for use. I have no idea whether that works since she lives on the other side of the next state over from me. But, she’s a believer in it.

Posted almost 7 years ago
Hi crochetkim Just found this one about hot peppers and vinegar. I like your grandmother’s idea, I had so many Habanero’s i tried it also put them in a jar and add vinegar and sugar and stick it in the fridge. Then I hung a bunch of habaneros’ up to dry in the window using fishing line, my friend took a bunch and made a Christmas wreath out of them. This is the year I’m going to have plenty of sweet peppers and winter squash. Ellen from Georgia
Posted over 6 years ago | Last edited over 6 years ago

I rarely make a sauce with the intent of it being hot. I prefer to showcase the overall character of the specific ingredients, but the best ones are just ingredients that have been cooked whole, and then puréed in a blender.

If I am aiming for a refined presentation I remove the skin after cooking to make a finer product, which I then add other flavorings to, purée, then reduce (cook to remove moisture), before pressing through a sieve.

If I am making it for myself, I often leave the skin on, and skip the sieve.

If I am concerned about the chili being too hot, I remove the placenta (the ledges that the seeds grow on) as well as the seeds. The majority of the capsaicin is formed in the placenta making it even hotter then the seeds.

If I want the sauce to be exceptionally hot, I dry the chilis first.

Alliums can be included raw for a more dramatic taste.

Also, don’t be afraid to make it sweet. Barbecue sauces are often loved because of the sugars, hot sauces can be also. Sugar, citrus fruits, honey, even chocolate have been added at times.

Posted over 6 years ago
viper125

viper125

Folia Helper

United States6

Well hot sauces come in many styles. When i say hot mine are usually Very hot. Growing my Trinidad Scorpions t-Butch for that. A drop or two for heat is all you need.
Now for flavor i make all different degrees. As mine i do like real hot.
The wife likes a real mild and some friends like that small burn in the back of your throat.
But even with vinegar you need to be careful of things. Easy to get poison with different bacteria. Especially fermenting or leaving un refrigerated.
A good base is carrot ,tomato, and this year I may try a cucumber base. I have learned I dont care for a citrus base. But citrus is used for protection in some.
Hope you have a great time with them as I do! And be sure if you get an especially good one you share the recipe.
My Scorpion sauce will be packaged in one dram bottles. Dont look like much but have never had any one need a refill for at least a year. LOL!

Posted over 6 years ago

I also like the Mango based hot sauces, especially for the fruity hot peppers.

Ghost Pepper sauce is great for the 2 drips added to cooking & fun to grow, but I like the sauces that I can really taste flavour as well as heat – although hubby just likes em’ HOT!

Posted over 6 years ago

When I grow cayennes I use them to make a hot pepper sauce, really simple and Southern. My folks just called it their “pepper sauce.” We had it on the table all the time.

Easy to do. I stuff some cayennes into a glass bottle with a non-reactive lid (I like to reuse hot sauce bottles like Frank’s Hot Sauce). I cut the tips off of mine but you don’t have to. I also like to add some whole peppercorns and a couple garlic cloves, but you can use anything with a flavor profile that you like — or just the plain peppers, too.

Then you take some vinegar, salt it, then bring it to a boil. Pour it over the cayennes, then stick it in the fridge. The longer it sits, the hotter it gets but you can use it the next day.

I use it on spinach and other greens, on eggs, burritos, tacos, and anything else that needs a little salty hot kick.

Posted over 6 years ago | Last edited over 6 years ago
viper125

viper125

Folia Helper

United States6

I eat hot every thing. And personally i get most my flavor from marinates, sauces and spices. I use hot sauce to heat things up. Peppers i want to taste and there are a few. I eat raw or add to foods. I make,cure and smoke all my own meats and make my own sauces and flavorings.
So for me a hot sauce is just heat. LOL1

Posted over 6 years ago

I ended up experimenting. I made a sauce like crochetkim suggested. It turned out great!

I also tried cooking, roasting and blending various types of peppers, either with a mix of onion, carrot and garlic, or just the chilies with vinegar (experimented with different types of vinegar too).

The hardest part was getting a smooth consistency, but I didn’t remove the skins (except when I roasted) and don’t have a sieve, so I know that’s the problem there.

My favs were a sambal-type sauce I made with a mix of different chilis and garlic and one I made with habaneros. My husbands friend liked the habanero sauce so much, he asked if I could make up a batch for him!

My experiment with fermenting was a disaster. Fermenting actually scares me! I need to learn more about it!

Posted over 6 years ago
viper125

viper125

Folia Helper

United States6

A juicer is almost needed to make a nice liquid sauce. It will turn carrots and all sorts of veggys to juice quickly. I find it great for mine. I love a mixed veggys batch as a base for lots of my sauces. But the really hot ones are best kept simple. As they are used for heat not taste.
I like a carrot,tomato,garlic and a little lime.

Posted over 6 years ago
viper125

viper125

Folia Helper

United States6

Hers a recipe to try,one of many. You can substitute peppers in any of them for the heat and flavor you like.

Volcano Lava Hot Sauce

12 fresh habanero chilies — roughly chopped
1 ripe mango — peel, pit, mash
1 cup cheap yellow prepared mustard
1/4 cup brown sugar — packed
1/4 cup white vinegar
1 tablespoon prepared curry powder
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon chili powder
salt and freshly cracked black pepper — to taste

This style of hot sauce, widely used in the West Indies, is basically habanero peppers (also known as Scotch Bonnets), fruit, and yellow mustard, with a few other ingredients thrown in. Use this recipe as a guideline. Habanero s are at the top of the Chile pepper heat scale, so feel free to substitute other peppers of your choice. Bring to a boil slowly Adding water or a juice to right consisity, Preferably out side. Puree and strain then Funnel the sauce into an old pint liquor bottle, then let your imagination run free as to what whopper you can lay on your guests regarding its origins. If you’re having trouble, here’s a start: “One day in Jamaica I was in this dingy bar and met this old guy who…” and you take it from there. Mix all the ingredients together and stand back. This will keep, covered and refrigerated, until the year 2018. Be careful, though: If it spills, it will eat a hole in your refrigerator. If you ever want to dispose of it, call the local toxic waste specialists. WARNING: Hottest sauce in North America. Use this to enhance dull and boring food. Keep away from pets, open flames, unsupervised children, and bad advice. This is not a toy. This is serious. Stand up straight, sit right, and stop mumbling. Be careful not to rub your nose, eyes, or mouth while working with habanero s. You may actually want to wear rubber gloves while chopping and mixing — these babies are powerful.

Posted over 6 years ago

Hi there! You're reading a conversation in the Chili and Hot Pepper Talk group on Folia.