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SerenDippity

SerenDippity's Cereus x 1 Flowering

Plant: Night blooming cereus (Cereus hexagonus) |

  • 3
  • Very Happy

Night Blooming Cereus
Or as my kid’s used to call it the DREADLOCK plant

I one of these plants in a hanging basket when we lived on Ruskin in West University. I bought a small cutting of the plant from Tea’s nursery when I was looking for something different. They had these huge baskets full of them with tendrils drooping almost to the floor. They were charging $60 to $100 per hanging basket! I think that is what inspired me to try the plant. They had a few 4 inch pots with one measly little stick in it for a couple of bucks, so I thought I’d try.
It took several years to get a full big basket sized plant. It is very sensitive to the cold, so if it is left outside and the temperature drops much below 50 you can lose part of the plant. In the summer, I hung it in the back yard. Unfortunately as the plant got bigger it took up half the sidewalk area. You pretty much had to duck to get past it to the back door. The kids thought it was ugly and a pain. I did manage to get it to bloom. One summer after it was 5 or 7 years old, it bloomed pretty white flowers about an inch in diameter. It bloomed at night and I only saw one fully open.

When we moved to the condo, I managed to keep it alive for a few years and then got lazy with it and left it out in the cold too long and it died. Year before last, I found a plant that someone had thrown out in the dumpster. It was covered with garbage, had been dumped out of it’s pot and was too far into the dumpster for me to recover more than just a handful of “DREADS”. I stuck them in a jar of water in my window and tried to see if I could get them to root. They did fine in the water and I ignored them, still being in my lazy phase. Last summer, one morning I awoke to my surprise to find the most beautiful bloom in my window. It was a good five inches in diameter. BEAUTIFUL!

It motivated me to transplant it. I was worried about transplant shock since it had been in water so long. About half the plant died. Then I almost lost the rest of it because I didn’t realize the pot I planted it in was not draining properly and it became waterlogged. As we moved to Dallas I have been babying it along and finally transplanted it into a hanging basket. I think it is doing good. Hopefully by the end of next summer I’ll have a full basket of DREADLOCKS again.

It is currently thriving in my laundry room. The hanging basket I planted it in is a wire frame with one of those coconut bowl things. duh. I knew I would have to bring it inside for the winter! It is even too sensitive for the garage. Well, when it was time to bring it in I searched frantically for a solution to keep it from dripping everywhere when it is watered. I ended up sitting the whole thing in a huge cobalt blue decorative bowl. I put in on top of the dryer. It has light and heat. It is actually still growing over the winter. I thought they went into a holding pattern of dormancy, but I guess not.

photos updated October 3, 2009

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Planting Data

Plant
Night blooming cereus (18)

Freebie.

SerenDippity's Cereus Care Instructions

Night blooming cereus normally tends to reach to a mature height of 2.70 metres [imperial: 8.78 feet] so ensure you have enough space in your garden for this plant.

Your garden has partial sun light - Night blooming cereus should be planted in a location that enjoys dappled sun.

Remember to water Night blooming cereus water very sparingly.

More information about Cereus is available in the Folia gardener's wiki. All Cereus Care Instructions have been kindly provided by our members.

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Comments

  • punkin

    punkin wrote:

    “It is actually still growing over the winter. I thought they went into a holding pattern of dormancy, but I guess not.”

    Its probably the effect of (dark) Canadian winters, but I find that in the winter, the night blooming cereus grow tall, shooting spikes which can reach over 8 feet. Those spikes eventually become “woody”, almost like thin tree trunks. In the summer, when they get plenty of light, they don’t shoot any spikes, but throw new leaves like crazy.

    These are my absolute favouritest plants to watch grow! Yours looks so happy in that hanging basket =D

    Posted on 02 May 09 (over 5 years ago)

  • SerenDippity

    SerenDippity wrote:

    Well, we certainly don’t have dark winters. It sat in my laundry room window and received a good bit of indirect sunlight but definitely made the shooting spike things you refer to. No where near 8 feet thank goodness, but they are very long.

    It’s outside again now. We are in the middle of some serious thunderstorms and heavy, heavy rain but as soon as I get a chance I’ll update the photos.

    Posted on 02 May 09 (over 5 years ago)

  • Willow87

    Willow87 wrote:

    I love cereus i looked for it at local nurseries around here. I’m going to try again next year but the flowers are beautiful!

    Posted on 30 Nov 10 (almost 4 years ago)

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