United States Edition

Zone maps for Australia

  • graibeard
    graibeard

    Folia Helper

    Folia Supporter 52 plants Australia9b

    Information regarding Zone maps for Australia is available from various sources, the one that is available via the Diggers Seed club seems to be the most useful – unfortunately New Zealand is not on it. There may well be others, if you find them then list them below – the more information available on the subject the better.


    • Wikipedia has an article on Hardiness zone which goes into some detail.
    • There was once a page available from the Australian National Botanic Gardens detailing Plant Hardiness Zones for Australia – a review of the data and comparison with the US system. It has disappeared from their system but is cached at archive org
      (Update) matcon has the updated link for this in the next post below.
    • heartofhush has the following description and link…
      This may help people as well and if you register the site emails you monthly reminders of what is being planted that month.

      http://www.gardenate.com/zones/

      However you don’t have to register to find out what to plant for that month.
    Posted over 4 years ago | Last edited about 3 years ago
  • 1 plants Australia10

    The Plant Hardiness Zones for Australia page can now be found at "http://www.anbg.gov.au/gardens/research/hort.research/zones.html

  • Posted about 4 years ago
  • 30 plants Australia10

    I’m a bit confused…the different maps seem to use different numbers. The botanic gardens one has number5 1-7 (but i noticed a “US” set of numbers next to the key), whereas the diggers ones has two sets of numbers, one for the cold map the other for the heat map, both of which go up to 13 or 14. So which number do i put in Folia?

  • Posted about 4 years ago
  • graibeard

    Folia Helper

    Folia Supporter
    52 plants Australia9b

    @Getafix, 10 and it relates to Cold zones as used in the USA.
    Given Sydney, on the botanic garden one its a guess whether it’s a 9 or 10 (Australian 3 or 4) but on the Diggers Cold Map it’s a 10.
    It is confusing with the two sets, the Wikipedia link and the Australian one are to help explain the logic used. Why the Aussie one decided on a new set of numbers is probably because standards are never happy if they are alone. ;)

  • Posted about 4 years ago
  • 6 plants Australia10

    Hi, You mentioned above>>> There may well be others, if you find them then list them below – the more information available on the subject the better.

    This may help people as well and if you register the site emails you monthly reminders of what is being planted that month.

    http://www.gardenate.com/zones/

    However you don’t have to register to find out what to plant for that month.

    I sure do hope it helps others.

  • Posted almost 4 years ago
  • graibeard

    Folia Helper

    Folia Supporter
    52 plants Australia9b

    Yep, thanks for that as the more the merrier.

    There’s also the recent addition to Folia What’s my USDA Climate zone? with instructions and further info here.

  • Posted almost 4 years ago
  • 4 plants Australia10

    Just been looking at the eldersweather.com, and looks like global warming is starting to affect the accuracy of the plant zoning. Gardenate.com has us (Brisbane) as sub-tropical with “ave summer < 30C” but in Logan city (south of Brisbane city) our average is heading north… much closer to the 30C mark. And the hardiness map has us as 0-5C in winter minimums, but we are now closer to 5C. I wonder at what point they will change the maps.

  • Posted over 3 years ago
  • 30 plants Australia10

    I would never have said Brisbane had an average summer of less than 30 degrees. I do believe we’re experiencing global warming but even when I was growing up I remember grumbling that we were supposed to be sent home from school when the temp went over 32 degrees but it was over 32 degrees for much of Dec, Feb and March and we never got to go home. :( I suppose the temps are based on airport temps which are always a few degrees cooler than the real city/suburb temp for Brisbane.

  • Posted over 3 years ago
  • 14 plants United States5a

    not to barge in but i just noticed in the American Horticultural Society Encyclopedia of Perennials book (when i was looking at it on Amazon) showed the whole world as it appears if the US zones were applied…

  • Posted over 3 years ago
  • Tomartyr

    Folia Helper

    0 plants New Zealand

    @nanamama – Yes it does, but in the hardcopy version of the book at least, the world map is reduced to about one third of a page in total, meaning that it is very hard (if not impossible) to be sure which zone applies to a particular locality, particularly as the colour coding is graduated, i.e. the colour for zone 8 is only marginally different to that for zone 9.

  • Posted over 3 years ago
  • 49 plants Australia9b

    The Digger’s link is dead, and a site search turns up nothing.

    I’ve never been sure what zone Toowoomba is in. We do get occasional winter frosts, but summer can be awfully warm and wet, or not!

    Like Australia in general, there isn’t really much ‘average’ weather here. Wet years, dry years come in cycles of several years. Warmer or colder years can occur singly or for a few years, independent of whether we are in a flood or drought cycle.

    I’d like to be able to post the number of zone, but not sure what it would be.

  • Posted about 3 years ago
  • graibeard

    Folia Helper

    Folia Supporter
    52 plants Australia9b

    I’ve corrected the Diggers links.
    They put Toowoomba as being a 9b.

  • Posted about 3 years ago
  • 49 plants Australia9b

    Thanks graibeard! Those are the most detailed maps I’ve seen for us. The heat zone is as you will know, as important as the cold zone, especially in AU. Toowoomba weather is not like anywhere around us, as the maps show. several years can pass without us ever getting down to -4C, but 9b sounds as close as any idea of ‘normal’ weather can be. Off to set my profile.

  • Posted about 3 years ago
  • 1 plants Australia9b

    9a, 9b, I really wish Diggers would add some city/towns to their map! ;)

    I also just found this link for a Folia US to Aussie converter, and down the bottom you can just type in your location and it tells you. However, I don’t know if it’s accurate or just based on what other people in the area put in.
    http://myfolia.com/zones/australian_zones_to_usda_zones

    So I still don’t know if I’m 9a or 9b!

  • Posted almost 3 years ago
  • 49 plants Australia9b

    Hi Jocelyn. If you want to be really accurate go to BOMA and look up the historical temps for your area. The USDA uses 30 year averages to set its zones.

    Personally, I don’t find the hardiness zones all that useful. The lowest temperature reached is more relevant for gardeners/farmers in very cold areas. It IS useful for other Folians to give them a rough idea of what you garden in if you ask for advice.

    In AU we don’t even HAVE all the USDA zones, and heat maximums and averages can be as useful or more to us. If you are interested in how some warmer area gardeners can define their areas look at the zones devised by Sunset Magazine in the US. http://www.sunset.com/garden/climate-zones/climate-zones-intro-us-map-00400000036421/

    Understanding your own tiny bit of the world is the most useful ‘zone’. I know nothing about Launceston’s weather, assuming that is where you are? But I know that here in Toowoomba knowing which side of town you are on makes a difference! The Eastern, Range side is foggier, damper and more temperate with fewer violent swings in temperature between day and night. The Western, Downs side is drier, less foggy and quite different. Roses grown there are less prone to black spot, as one example.

    Hopefully you will find more Folians from your area who can give you a better idea of how to deal with your specific climate. IF there is a decent nursery near you, make friends with them! When I first moved here I relied heavily on one woman especially and she made my gardening so much easier. If I can buy locally, I do. Support your local nursery and they will survive and be there to offer you advice specific to your area.

  • Posted almost 3 years ago
  • 1 plants Australia9b

    Thanks Lilly Pilly! I think that’s the thing I don’t get – you look at the map of Aus an so much of it is supposedly the same colour/zone – doesn’t seem right to me. That link you’ve given explains so much about how climates can vary dramatically. I notice huge micro-climate changes not just just within my neighborhood, but even within my own yard!

    I guess I’m more used to thinking of plants as belonging to groups governed more by “climates” than numbers, like in this map on wiki.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate

    I guess the moral for me is that I’m not going to pay too much attention to the numbers, and a lot more attention to my neighbours yards. :)

  • Posted almost 3 years ago
  • 49 plants Australia9b

    Hi Jocelyn. I know, the whole map thing is pretty weird, especially when it is based on conditions most of us here don’t experience. Your view of plants by ‘climate’ is far more sound than by-the-numbers. Gardeners have to think in more all encompassing ways. I could theoretically grow many things that would in reality go toes up in my hot, rainy (at long last!) summer.

    Walking around your neighbourhood late afternoon/early evening when people (especially gardeners) are outside in summer can be very enlightening. While you are paying attention to the neighbour’s yards, have a chat if you see anyone out watering. Most people are happy to talk to you about their plants and many will offer you cuttings too :-)

  • Posted almost 3 years ago
  • 1 plants Australia9b

    I was thinking about this a bit more, and wondered if there are any correlations that could be drawn to gardening from something more like this… a vegetation type map.

    http://www.anra.gov.au/topics/vegetation/images/native_vegetation/fig01.gif

    Although I’m sure I’m getting well off topic of the original thread by now. I guess there are a hundred ways to predict what might grow, but only one way to test it – plant the seeds! ;)

  • Posted almost 3 years ago
  • graibeard

    Folia Helper

    Folia Supporter
    52 plants Australia9b

    Yeah, we are drifting a bit. :-)

    This thread was here to help those of us ‘not’ in America to work out our zones so that we could fit in with that part of Folia’s design. If you like, it’s purely a mechanical aid to fill the appropriate box. There have been, or were, discussions in the Folia… groups about it but they didn’t lead anywhere as I recall.

    Admittedly the systems in place, and net resources, have made it easier to draw that paper based comparison, but originally it was really a case of guesswork and the numbers were all over the place – thus this help page.

    The zones are less than ideal for us and when it comes down to it, what your physical neighbour is growing is the best indicator of all. However, as broad as they are, they do give us a start when comparing with other gardeners. The rest is down to trial and error, or the experience of others.

    I agree, planting seeds is certainly the best way. :-) Telling your neighbour of your success’s and failures then propagates that information, and when you don’t have those immediate neighbours, or friendly and knowledgeable, local retailers then Folia comes to the rescue, whether it be by journals, plantings, swaps or group chats.

  • Posted almost 3 years ago
  • Folia Supporter
    283 plants Australia9b

    I had no problem with the botanic garden scale and found for my area (Castlemaine in Central Victoria) it fitted quite well with what I originally picked as our equivalent of USDA zone 9b.

    We have many nights where it gets down -1C and we will usually clock one or two -4C (I wish I could put the little 0 symbol in for degrees).

    However, Bendigo just 40kms up the road not only registers hotter summer temps than us but also some colder winter temps. I find this strange as we cannot grow fuschias here nor the beautiful jacaranda trees and yet Bendigo can.

    Yep, guess it is better to suss out what the neighbours are growing. Certainly turns out a lot better on the pocket in the long run.

  • Posted about 2 years ago

Join the conversation!

You'll need to sign up for a free account, or log in if you're already a member.

Folia is the best Garden Tracking community on the web - take our Tour to find out more.

Hi there! You're reading a conversation in the Australian and New Zealand gardeners: Welcome & Chat group on Folia.

This group is to give both Australian & New Zealand gardeners an opportunity to introduce themselves to their immediate neighbours, and also to the Folia community at large.
It can also be used for any gardening related chit chat that may be specific to locals only.
If you have a gardening event that you want to broadcast feel free to post it here – just note the state and year in the subject line, after its title.

Topic Watchers

Other Recent Topics See more...

Buzz

Treehugger logo

Folia's cool webtool helps you get all your seeds in a row - from listing chores to tracking frosts, researching sowing and harvesting timing to tracking observations about your garden.

More buzz about us...

Latest Activity

Folia Badges and Widgets

Folia Blog Widgets

Want some super cool badges to stick on your blog? What about a funky widget that shows everyone what you are growing? Sounds like you need to get over to our Goodies page pronto!

Tour | About | Help & Support | Contact | Terms | Privacy | Community Guidelines | Goodies

Homegrown by Nic & Nath All photos and content © their respective owners.

Free Gardening database | Free garden organizer | Vegetable garden software | Mobile gardening app

Popular Plants: Tomato | Sweet pepper | Chili pepper | Basil | Bean | Carrot | Cucumber | Rose | Lettuce | Onion | Strawberry | Daylily | Spinach | Potato | Radish